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Thread: Grey Wagtail (Motacilla cinerea)

  1. #1

    Eastern Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla tschutschensis)

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    Eastern Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla tschutschensis) by alabang, on Flickr

    The Eastern Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla tschutschensis) is a small passerine in the wagtail family Motacillidae, which also includes the pipits and longclaws.

    This species breeds in temperate Asia and has a foothold in North America in Alaska. Populations migrate to south Asia and Australia.
    Vagrant individuals occur around the winter quarters at migration time. For example, on Palau in Micronesia migrant flocks of this species – apparently of the Bering Sea Yellow Wagtail, and including many adult males – are regularly seen, while further north on the Marianas, only the occasional stray individual – usually females or immatures as it seems – is encountered.[1]

    It is a slender 15–16 cm long bird, with the characteristic long, constantly wagging tail of its genus. The breeding adult male is basically olive above and yellow below. In other plumages, the yellow may be diluted by white. The heads of breeding males come in a variety of colours and patterns depending on subspecies.

    The call is a characteristic high-pitched jeet.[2]

    This insectivorous bird inhabits open country near water, such as wet meadows. It nests in tussocks, laying 4-8 speckled eggs.

    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Yellow_Wagtail

    Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Baños,_Laguna

    Settings: 1/640 ƒ/5.6 ISO 160 800mm
    Last edited by dolina; December 10th, 2013 at 02:14 AM. Reason: Corrected bird identification
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  2. #2
    Administrator Aloicious's Avatar
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    very nice. how do you like that 800 f5.6 IS monster?
    -Justin

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  3. #3
    At the time of purchase in early 2009 the 800 was a very light awesome lens but it proves to be a bit difficult to work with in thick rainforests where light is greatly reduced.

    BTW made a correction to the identification
    Last edited by dolina; December 10th, 2013 at 02:17 AM.

  4. #4
    Administrator Aloicious's Avatar
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    nice, I used to have a 600 f4, which was a great lens, but the weight was just a bit much for hikes or any sort of handheld shots. I used a 1.4x converter on it sometimes making it roughly 840mm f5.6 and I totally understand what you're saying about less than ideally lit circumstances.
    -Justin

    Bodies - D800E
    Lenses - Sigma 18-35 f1.8 DC | Zeiss 15mm f2.8 ZF.2 | Zeiss 21mm f2.8 ZF.2 | Sigma 35mm f1.4 Art | 105mm f2.5 AI-S | 70-200 f2.8G VRII | 200mm F4.0D Micro AF | 300mm f2.8 VRII

    My PhotographyWild Blog

    C&C is always welcome on the images I post.

  5. #5
    I could imagine. If I had to carry something heavier than the 800 I wouldn't be birding. ;)

    But If I were to buy a lens today I'd go with the 600 that weighs about 3.9kg, a full .6kg lighter than the 800 unless of course a pre-owned 800 can be had for a good discount. ;)

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